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myresortofawesomeness:

theexorcist:

Dick Smith, legendary make-up artist known for his groundbreaking and iconic work on such films as The Godfather, Amadeus, Altered States, Taxi Driver and The Exorcist, has passed away at age 92.
Born in Larchmont, New York, in 1922, Richard Emerson Smith began his career in 1945 as NBC’s first staff make-up artist and by 1950 was the head of the make-up department, training his own staff of 25 budding artists. His self-taught talents quickly earned him several Emmy nominations and a win in 1967 for Mark Twain Tonight! 
After 14 years with NBC where he pioneered techniques using foam latex, plastics and make-up tones for colour television, Smith then moved on to the big screen.
His technical innovations in films such as Little Big Man and The Godfather were initially seen by his peers as unorthodox, however, those techniques soon became industry standards which are still used to this day. Smith went on to create some of his most memorable work transforming young Linda Blair into a demon-possessed child and aging Max Von Sydow thirty-seven years in The Exorcist, along with the landmark full-body latex suits and fantastical effects in Altered States.
In 1984, Smith began offering training through his advanced make-up course and has mentored some of the biggest names in the industry, from Oscar winning make-up artists Stan Winston, Greg Cannom and Rick Baker (who’s first professional job was assistant to Smith on The Exorcist), to directors Guillermo del Toro and J. J. Abrams.
Smith was honored by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences with a retrospective tribute in 2009, and two years later he became the first make-up artist to receive an Honorary Oscar for lifetime achievement at the Governor’s Awards (watch Linda Blair’s speech here, and Smith’s emotional acceptance here).
With an astonishing career spanning over 60 years, Dick Smith’s timeless body of work, passion and generosity has influenced many and will continue to inspire for generations to come.
Rest in peace, "The Godfather of Make-Up."

RIP

myresortofawesomeness:

theexorcist:

Dick Smith, legendary make-up artist known for his groundbreaking and iconic work on such films as The Godfather, Amadeus, Altered States, Taxi Driver and The Exorcist, has passed away at age 92.

Born in Larchmont, New York, in 1922, Richard Emerson Smith began his career in 1945 as NBC’s first staff make-up artist and by 1950 was the head of the make-up department, training his own staff of 25 budding artists. His self-taught talents quickly earned him several Emmy nominations and a win in 1967 for Mark Twain Tonight!

After 14 years with NBC where he pioneered techniques using foam latex, plastics and make-up tones for colour television, Smith then moved on to the big screen.

His technical innovations in films such as Little Big Man and The Godfather were initially seen by his peers as unorthodox, however, those techniques soon became industry standards which are still used to this day. Smith went on to create some of his most memorable work transforming young Linda Blair into a demon-possessed child and aging Max Von Sydow thirty-seven years in The Exorcist, along with the landmark full-body latex suits and fantastical effects in Altered States.

In 1984, Smith began offering training through his advanced make-up course and has mentored some of the biggest names in the industry, from Oscar winning make-up artists Stan Winston, Greg Cannom and Rick Baker (who’s first professional job was assistant to Smith on The Exorcist), to directors Guillermo del Toro and J. J. Abrams.

Smith was honored by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences with a retrospective tribute in 2009, and two years later he became the first make-up artist to receive an Honorary Oscar for lifetime achievement at the Governor’s Awards (watch Linda Blair’s speech here, and Smith’s emotional acceptance here).

With an astonishing career spanning over 60 years, Dick Smith’s timeless body of work, passion and generosity has influenced many and will continue to inspire for generations to come.

Rest in peace, "The Godfather of Make-Up."

RIP

(via pricklylegs)

CARPENTER: I had a research screening of The Thing - I showed this film to a bunch of teenagers, and one teenage girl, fourteen years old, she said, ‘Well, what happened in the end? When the two men were sitting out in the snow?’ And I said, ‘Well, that’s part of the nature of the story, you have to use your imagination,’ and she says, ‘Oh, I hate that.’
ATKINS: I paid you five dollars for this—
TUTTLE: For you to tell me what to think!
CORMAN: The audience, whether it’s in a motion picture or a book, must participate with the artist. So part of it comes from the artist, and there is a feedback and a response from the audience. And that girl, I would hope, is a very minor point of the audience.
BARKER: I think she’s a growing part of the audience. I think that’s part of the banality of the culture, the spoonfed element of the culture. Young people are asked to use their imaginations less and less—and you know, in a way, we do a wretched thing to them. We teach them the reality of Santa Claus and Neverneverland up until the age of five, and then we tell them at the age of five, ‘That was all lies, here’s the gross natural product of Chile,’ and we’ve got this very bland, 1999 vision of the world, we’ve got a place in which imagination has been scoured, not just from the five-year-old, but from the whole culture.

John Carpenter, Pete Atkins, Lisa Tuttle, Roger Corman, Clive Barker, Horror Café, 1990.

at what level of regurgitation does this observation in itself become just another one of those banalities, i wonder …

(via ikaristwin)

(via lobstrocities)

popculturebrain:

Trailer: ‘Into the Woods' - Dec 25

Directed by Rob Marshall, written by James Lapine, starring Meryl Streep, Anna Kendrick, Johnny Depp, Emily Blunt, Chris Pine, Lucy Punch, Christine Baranski, James Corden, Mackenzie Mauzy and Tracey Ullman.

How dare they not put any singing in this trailer. Looks like a lot of Disney magic and not much of anything else. Still the cast is reason enough to be excited.

(via filmandfeels)

Well they totally took out all the best songs and we're worried some of these big name actors are going to Russell Crowe us and besmirch what was a glorious and beautiful musical.

Asked by
Anonymous

Presented without comment, re: Into the Woods

does fanwank mean good or bad talk? because I haven't seen any negative fan feedback yet. a lot of excitement over the cast, though, and general love for the original musical.

Asked by
Anonymous

Fanwank is generally bad - hence the wank. There seem to be a lot of angry people who are planning not to see the movie for reasons unbeknownst to me. I know absolutely nil about the musical Into the Woods is apparently based on, so I couldn’t really tell you what the deal is. According to the answers to my question, it seems to be a combination of overDisney-fied content, diversions from the original material, and lack of diversity that fans are having problems with.