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THE IMITATION GAME

The Imitation Game is a nail-biting race against time following Alan Turing (pioneer of modern-day computing and credited with cracking the German Enigma code) and his brilliant team at Britain’s top-secret code-breaking centre, Bletchley Park, during the darkest days of World War II. Turing (played by Benedict Cumberbatch), whose contributions and genius significantly shortened the war, saving thousands of lives, was the eventual victim of an unenlightened British establishment, but his work and legacy live on. Keira Knightley, Matthew Goode, Charles Dance, Allen Leech and Rory Kinnear also star. The Imitation Game is in theaters November 14, 2014.

I ORIGINS

I Origins is the second feature film from writer and director Mike Cahill (Another Earth) and tells the story of Dr. Ian Gray (Michael Pitt), a molecular biologist studying the evolution of the eye. He finds his work permeating his life after a brief encounter with an exotic young woman (Astrid Bergès-Frisbey) who slips away from him. As his research continues years later with his lab partner Karen (Brit Marling), they make a stunning scientific discovery that has far reaching implications and complicates both his scientific and spiritual beliefs. Traveling half way around the world, he risks everything he has ever known to validate his theory.

I am seeing ioriginsmovie tonight and I am very excited! I’m a fan of both Michael Pitt and Brit Marling, and I enjoyed Another Earth, so I am definitely looking forward to this one.

Are there any movie scores that you feel didn't mesh with the film? I'm trying to think of one, but can't think of any. I think maybe the new Gatsby movie is one. I get what they were going for with the modern soundtrack, but I didn't think it worked well. It took away more than it added to the movie. What do you think?

Asked by
Anonymous

For Gatsby, I think the startling contrast of the modern music was intentional. I thought it was a little much, but it was the least of the problems in that hot mess of a movie. I can’t really think of any films whose soundtracks didn’t mesh well with the movie. The only recent one that comes to mind is The Amazing Spider-Man 2's score, which was fucking awful. Completely took me out of the movie.

Can you please tell me names of movies that actually changed your life or even the way you look at things? Thank you in advance xx

Asked by
Anonymous

Modern Times (1936) - after Fantasia, it was the next film I saw that really made me appreciate silent films. 

Fantasia (1940) - the first time I fell in love with the movies.

Lawrence of Arabia (1962) - my all time favorite film. Gave me an appreciation for character development, which is why I’m always harping about this in any movie I watch. 

Harold and Maude (1971) - one of my all time favorite movies because it deals with life and death in a unique way. 

Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981) - watched this and decided I wanted to be like Indiana Jones. Initially majored in Anthropology because of it. It broke my heart when my Anthropology professor said the first day of the 101 class: “Real life archaeologists are not like Indiana Jones”. 

Ferris Bueller’s Day Off (1986) - Any time I feel like I’m in a rut, I ask myself “What would Ferris do?”

The Land Before Time (1988) - first encounter with death in the movies - traumatizing experience as a child.

Cinema Paradiso (1988) - well duh.

Dead Poets Society (1989) - still pretty inspirational, even after all this time. Carpe diem! Suck the marrow out of life!

It (1990) - fostered my crippling fear of clowns. Tried to rewatch it a decade later and was immediately reminded of how scared I was that I cried at the opening credits.

Bata, Bata Paano Ka Ginawa (1998) - a fantastic Filipino film that challenged gender roles in the Philippines. I remember watching this and loving the way it explored the traditionally patriarchal society in the Philippines.  

The Matrix (1999) - first time seeing something that was wildly entertaining but also thought-provoking, forcing me to ask great philosophical questions about the nature of reality, whether ignorance really is bliss, etc. I remember being really obsessed with this movie while at the same time suffering a mild existential crisis. I was 12.

Bowling for Columbine (2002) - had not really seen a whole lot of documentaries that were informative but also engaging, evocative and provocative. This got me into documentaries.

The Life of David Gale (2003) - had never really contemplated the justice in the justice system until I saw this movie. Actually, now that I think about it, A Time to Kill probably also falls under this category of reasoning.

Magnifico (2003) - a film that I think perfectly encapsulates Filipino culture and spirit. Inspiring and with great social commentary. 

Control Room (2004) - a fantastic, eye-opening documentary about journalism and the media, and brings up great questions about bias and reporting.

Into the Wild (2007) - I think it’s got a great message. “Happiness is only real when shared”. I think it took the image of the meandering twentysomething and gave it an interesting spin. Yeah, backpacking in the wilderness seems like a fantastic, soul-searching experience, but there are ways to still do this without completely severing your connection with society.

Jiro Dreams of Sushi (2012) - truly inspirational. As cheesy as it sounds, it really gave me a different perspective on life.

There are many more films that are transformational, but these are the ones I can think of off the top of my head right now.

What’s in your list of life-affirming or transformational films?

To the people who don’t believe whitewashing and the villifying, degrading or erasing of people of color isn’t a constant problem in film, I give you Exodus: Gods and Kings. But it’s Christian Bale! Joel Edgerton! Sigourney Weaver! And Ridley Scott directs it! All talented people! Hmm is there an absence of talented actors and actresses of color? I am curious to see whether the casting call for this film even contemplated hiring minorities in the lead roles. My guess? Doubtful. I’d rather not support a film that seems to perpetuate the idea that when white actors are hired, it’s a matter of talent, but hiring people of color is merely an attempt at diversity. 

dailydot:

Whitewashed ‘Exodus’ cast sparks a Twitter riot
Remember when Noah’s screenwriter explained that everyone in his movie was white because it was “mythical,” and because white people are apparently universal stand-ins for the human race?
Directed by Ridley Scott, the forthcoming Exodus: Gods and Kings stars Christian Bale as Moses, Joel Edgerton as Rhamses, and Aaron Paul as Joshua.

Just look at the imagery here. You have Sigourney Weaver, Joel Edgerton and Christian Bale in brilliant regalia in the center with men of color in the background as faceless soldiers and servants manning the entrance to this temple. Really, Hollywood? You’re not even trying. 

dailydot:

Whitewashed ‘Exodus’ cast sparks a Twitter riot

Remember when Noah’s screenwriter explained that everyone in his movie was white because it was “mythical,” and because white people are apparently universal stand-ins for the human race?

Directed by Ridley Scott, the forthcoming Exodus: Gods and Kings stars Christian Bale as Moses, Joel Edgerton as Rhamses, and Aaron Paul as Joshua.

Just look at the imagery here. You have Sigourney Weaver, Joel Edgerton and Christian Bale in brilliant regalia in the center with men of color in the background as faceless soldiers and servants manning the entrance to this temple. Really, Hollywood? You’re not even trying.