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MOMENTS THAT CHANGED THE MOVIES: JURASSIC PARK

I remember exactly when and where I watched Jurassic Park. The groundbreaking Steven Spielberg film is pure awesome in its showcase of special effects, and a hallmark of what is now known as the movie blockbuster. This short documentary from Academy Originals explores why the film is so iconic.

The Krakow ghetto “liquidation” scene in Schindler’s List was only a page of action in the script, but Steven Spielberg turned it into 20 pages and 20 minutes of screen action “based on living witness testimony”. For example, the scene in which the young man escapes capture by German soldiers by telling them he was ordered to clear the luggage from the street was taken directly from a survivor’s story (x).
In Schindler’s List, during the scene in which the last of the Krakow Jews are taken from their homes to be relocated to the ghetto, one man stops to remove something from the door post of his residence. What he removes is a Mezuzah, a case containing a passage from the Torah (Deuteronomy 6:4-9), which Jews traditionally affix to the door frames of their houses as a constant reminder of God’s presence (x).
In Schindler’s List, during the scene in which the last of the Krakow Jews are taken from their homes to be relocated to the ghetto, one man stops to remove something from the door post of his residence. What he removes is a Mezuzah, a case containing a passage from the Torah (Deuteronomy 6:4-9), which Jews traditionally affix to the door frames of their houses as a constant reminder of God’s presence (x).

Schindler’s List was a deeply personal film for director Steven Spielberg. He insisted that all royalties and residuals from this film that would normally have gone to him be given to the Shoah Foundation, which records and preserves written and videotaped testimonies from survivors of genocide worldwide, including the Holocaust. He also refused to accept a salary for making the film and does not autograph any materials related to it. 

When Spielberg returned to Cal State Long Beach to earn his BA 34 years after dropping out, his film professor accepted this movie in place of the short student film normally required to pass the class. This movie had already won Spielberg Golden Globes and Oscars for Best Director and Best Picture. Spielberg has also mentioned that if there are only two films he is to be remembered by, he would like them to be E.T.: The Extra Terrestrial and Schindler’s List (x).
Schindler’s List was a deeply personal film for director Steven Spielberg. He insisted that all royalties and residuals from this film that would normally have gone to him be given to the Shoah Foundation, which records and preserves written and videotaped testimonies from survivors of genocide worldwide, including the Holocaust. He also refused to accept a salary for making the film and does not autograph any materials related to it. 
When Spielberg returned to Cal State Long Beach to earn his BA 34 years after dropping out, his film professor accepted this movie in place of the short student film normally required to pass the class. This movie had already won Spielberg Golden Globes and Oscars for Best Director and Best Picture. Spielberg has also mentioned that if there are only two films he is to be remembered by, he would like them to be E.T.: The Extra Terrestrial and Schindler’s List (x).