The Film Fatale

Scroll to Info & Navigation

GONE GIRL

On the eve of her fifth wedding anniversary, Amy Dunne (Rosamund Pike) goes missing. The mystery surrounding her disappearance beguiles the police and the media, who hone in on husband Nick Dunne (Ben Affleck) as the prime suspect. The investigation leads to revelations that shatter the picture perfect portrait of the Dunnes’ marriage. Based on the best-selling novel by Gillian Flynn and directed by David Fincher (Se7en, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo), Gone Girl also features Tyler Perry, Neil Patrick Harris and Patrick Fugit, and will arrive in theaters on October 3, 2014 (via iTunes).

Two of the taglines for the 2011 remake of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, ”Evil shall with evil be expelled” and “What is hidden in snow comes forth in the thaw” are Swedish proverbs. Swedish actor Stellan Skarsgård, who played Martin Vanger, told them to director David Fincher during filming. Fincher liked them and thought they fitted the story and setting well, so he made them taglines for the movie (x).


There are cinematographers who became cinematographers because they loved the voodoo of it. They love it when the director says to them, “Right down that corner, will we be able to see that or is that gonna kind of melt away?” And they get to go, “Just wait until tomorrow. It’s gonna be amazing. You’re gonna love it.” And I’ve had those experiences. I’ve sat through dailies and gone, “Oh!” You know, some of Darius Khondji’s work on Se7en. You just go “Wow.” But there is an equal amount of times that you go, you’ll look at it and say, “What the fuck?” - Director David Fincher, on shooting with film stock, SIde by Side (2012)
There are cinematographers who became cinematographers because they loved the voodoo of it. They love it when the director says to them, “Right down that corner, will we be able to see that or is that gonna kind of melt away?” And they get to go, “Just wait until tomorrow. It’s gonna be amazing. You’re gonna love it.” And I’ve had those experiences. I’ve sat through dailies and gone, “Oh!” You know, some of Darius Khondji’s work on Se7en. You just go “Wow.” But there is an equal amount of times that you go, you’ll look at it and say, “What the fuck?” - Director David Fincher, on shooting with film stock, SIde by Side (2012)
Director David Fincher, in the DVD commentary for Se7en, mentions something that he learned while working at special effects company Industrial Light and Magic: that a director should look at a scene with the left eye for composition, because it goes to your right brain. Focus or technical side of a shot should be looked at with the right eye or left brain, as it’s more of a technical eye (x).

Director David Fincher, in the DVD commentary for Se7en, mentions something that he learned while working at special effects company Industrial Light and Magic: that a director should look at a scene with the left eye for composition, because it goes to your right brain. Focus or technical side of a shot should be looked at with the right eye or left brain, as it’s more of a technical eye (x).

The crowded urban streets filled with noisy denizens and an oppressive rain that always seems to fall without respite were integral parts of Se7en, as Fincher wanted to show a city that was “dirty, violent, polluted, often depressing. Visually and stylistically, that’s how we wanted to portray this world. Everything needed to be as authentic and raw as possible.” To this end, Fincher turned to production designer Arthur Max to create a dismal world that often eerily mirrors its inhabitants. “We created a setting that reflects the moral decay of the people in it”, says Max. “Everything is falling apart, and nothing is working properly.” The film’s brooding, dark look was achieved through a chemical process called bleach bypass, wherein the silver in the film stock was not removed, which in turn deepened the dark, shadowy images in the film and increased its overall tonal quality (x).

The crowded urban streets filled with noisy denizens and an oppressive rain that always seems to fall without respite were integral parts of Se7en, as Fincher wanted to show a city that was “dirty, violent, polluted, often depressing. Visually and stylistically, that’s how we wanted to portray this world. Everything needed to be as authentic and raw as possible.” To this end, Fincher turned to production designer Arthur Max to create a dismal world that often eerily mirrors its inhabitants. “We created a setting that reflects the moral decay of the people in it”, says Max. “Everything is falling apart, and nothing is working properly.” The film’s brooding, dark look was achieved through a chemical process called bleach bypass, wherein the silver in the film stock was not removed, which in turn deepened the dark, shadowy images in the film and increased its overall tonal quality (x).

For me a movie has always been the theatrical experience, going into a sensory-deprivation environment with more people than you could healthily know in your social life. Strangers. And having the lights go out and having the lights go up on a portal that gives you insight and entertainment and controls what you hear and see for two hours. That communal experience is a movie to me. That’s half of the experience.

Director David Fincher, in an interview with Empire Magazine